Friday, October 18, 2013

Buy Your Drawsharp!

You can now order your Drawsharp by clicking below!



The price is $84.00 plus $12.00 shipping and handling (Shipping rate calculated for the continental U.S., Massachusetts residents add local sales tax)
International shipping will be calculated per destination

14 comments:

Rev John said...

Hi Peter, I just purchased one, the payment on PalPal under my wife's account. Is there a way for you to sign it somewhere? or even the instructions?
Hope all is going well. Sorry to have missed you at WIA.
Shalom

Peter Galbert said...

Rev John,
what is the name that the tool was ordered under? I'll be sure to sign it,
cheers,
Pete

Anonymous said...

Hi Peter,
May I ask if you still grind before using the Drawsharp, or does it negate the need for grinding altogether?
Thanks,
Maree from Australia.

Peter Galbert said...

Maree,
it depends on what you are working with. If the knife has a terrible abused edge or is ground at an overly high angle, then grinding is still the fastest way to get the tool ready for honing. We are also offering a "rehab" kit that has coarser diamond plates for folks who want to do it with the Drawsharp. I have used my regular extra fine grit to rehab many knives and it just depends on the condition of the tool and how much work you want to do. With the rehab kit of coarser diamonds, you can do a surprising amount of material removal in a short time. Once the angles are established and you've sharpened your tool with the Drawsharp, it will go miles before needing any attention besides a quick working with the silica carbide. I hope that helps,
Pete

Thomas Barry said...

Peter. Thank you! The combination of the drawknife sharpening practice of Curtis B. and the final honing with your incredible Drawsharp, now provides me with the most remarkable cutting edge. I have for years thought I had a fine edge on my tools, your design has raised the bar. Only problem now is I've stopped working greenwood and just sharpen draw knives. It's addicting!

Thanks!

Peter Galbert said...

Thomas,
I'm glad that you've found it to be so useful. I am having the same problem, I have so much fun sharpening now that my work is suffering!

Jamie Bacon said...

I have a nice side axe with a curved cutting edge of 8" or so. Would the Drawsharp be good to use on this?

Thanks,

Jamie Bacon

Peter Galbert said...

Jamie,
the drawsharp uses the back of the drawknife as a reference, so unless the tool you are describing is similar in shape and size, I wouldn't be able to assure that it would work,
Send me an image if you like,
Pete

Jamie Bacon said...

Thanks for the quick response Peter. Good point. Guess I didn't think that one through before I asked the question. Still thrilled that I received one for Christmas though. Have only had time to put it together so far but I can't wait to put it to use on a few draw knives. A quality made tool to be sure.

Anonymous said...

Peter - would this work on an inshave, at least on the flatter part of the curve?
Larry Barrett

Brian Eve said...

Hey Peter,

I'd also like to know if it would work on an inshave or a scorp.

Thanks!

Peter Galbert said...

Brian,
I've heard folks use it on the scorp, but it's not exactly designed for it. But if it helps, I say "why not?"

Anonymous said...

Would I be able to use it for a long Japanese kitchen knife with a straight back, but an edge that curves to the tip the last 1/4 of the length?

Peter Galbert said...

While it wasn't designed for kitchen knives, it will work with them. The angle that the bevel is sharpened with change along the length where it tapers, but that shouldn't be a problem,