Monday, January 12, 2009

Knockin' it Together

Here is the video of the assembly of the perch. It went smoothly which is encouraging news for the new measuring and drilling method.
You'll notice in the video that the joints are more than a tight fit. They are what I call a hammer fit. I aim to make the tolerance between the mortise and the tenon between 1 or 2 thousandths of an inch. It may take some getting used to driving such tight joints and learning to make corrections while doing so (once driven even partially home, the joints are near impossible to twist), but I feel that the results warrant the extra attention.



Here is the link to see the video direct on Youtube.com

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hello, Pete
I was wondering if you ever had any luck with bending anymore red oak?

Peter Galbert said...

I haven't given the red oak another try, mainly because I prefer white oak and it's easily found in my area. Apparently, red oaks properties vary by region, I have plenty of friends in the south who swear by it!

Anonymous said...

hello peter, here's a comment from the old world (sweden). I have been reading your blog fore some weeks now and really find it interesting. lots of tips for the a "pending" chairmaker like me! i'm looking forware to read new posts
/magnus

Anonymous said...

Peter - In the Brian Boggs presentation at Berea he made a point of saying that you can get better end-grain to end-grain glueups (with hide glue)by applying the glue to mortise and tenon, waiting a little bit (15 min) and then re-glue and assemble. I notice that you do not do that (nor do I, so far). Do you have an opinion? I might worry about the super-dry tenon absorbing some moisture and becoming really hard to assemble.
I am enjoying your blog and these recent ones - I have a 'perch' underway.
Larry Barrett

Peter Galbert said...

Magnus,
thanks for the encouragement, I'm glad to hear that the blog has made it so far!

Larry,
I've been aware of Brians work with sizing the hide glue for some time, but haven't had a chance to test it out myself. It sounds like a good idea, but I'm not sure about a few points, mainly whether the 2nd coat of hide glue dissolves the sizing coat enough to bond as expected. I know that Brian is incredibly inquisitive and fastidious in his methods, so the best bet is that sizing is a good idea. I know Curtis Buchanan has taken to doing it on some joints, but he told me that it seemed to cause his pine seats to split, so he only uses it in the hardwood mortise and tenons. Let me know if you play with it, I'd be curious. Thanks,
Pete

Peter M. said...

Pete,
Your generosity in sharing your deep expertise via the blog and video clips is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

Peter Galbert said...

Thanks Peter, and all those who've contacted me lately, I appreciate the feedback!

Anonymous said...

Hello,
I tried to split a white oak log yesterday and after leap froging the wedges down both sides and having a one inch split down both sides it still would not let go. Is this a bad log?

Peter Galbert said...

On the contrary, if its a straight log, then it's desire to stay together might mean that it will bend without breaking! Each log is different, but I usually take a tough splitting log to be a good sign.
White oak can be a tricky to split, you might try making some large hardwood wedges and driving them in and then using a hatchet to sever the remaining cross fibers. The first split is always the hardest because of the circular tension, the subsequent splits should be easier. Let me know how it goes, especially how it bends, good luck!

Claire Minihan said...

These Vids, are terrifically helpful Pete. Should have started reading the blog a long time ago!